Mon, 25 July 2022

6:30 pm - 7:30 pm BST

Zoom

Don’t Trust Your Gut – How to Use Data Instead of Instinct to Make Better Choices

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

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Big life decisions are hard. We might consult friends and family or read advice online, but in the end we usually just do what feels right. But what if there was a better way forward?

As economist and former Google data scientist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz argues, our gut is actually not that reliable – and data can prove this. 

In this livestream event, he will unearth the startling conclusions that the right data can teach us about who we are and what will make our lives better. 

Over the past decade, scholars have mined enormous datasets to find remarkable new approaches to life’s biggest self-help puzzles, from the boring careers that produce the most wealth, to old-school, data-backed relationship advice. While we often think we know how to better ourselves, the numbers, it turns out, disagree.

Telling fascinating stories through the latest big data research, Stephens-Davidowitz will reveal just how wrong we really are when it comes to improving our lives, and offers a new way of tackling our most consequential choices.

Praise for Seth Stephens-Davidowitz’s Don’t Trust Your Gut:

‘Don’t Trust Your Gut is a tour de force — an intoxicating blend of analysis, humor, and humanity’ – Daniel Pink

‘Seth Stephens-Davidowitz is an expert on data-driven thinking, and this engaging book is full of surprising, useful insights for using the information at your fingertips to make better decisions’ – Adam Grant

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Seth Stephens-Davidowitz

Writer, economist and former Google data scientist

Seth Stephens-Davidowitz is a contributing op-ed writer for the New York Times, a lecturer at The Wharton School, and a former Google data scientist. He received a BA from Stanford and a PhD from Harvard. His research has appeared in the Journal of Public Economics and other prestigious publications. His 2017 book Everybody Lies was a New York Times bestseller, and was named a book of the year by both PBS NewsHour and the Economist.